The Mission of the James C. Kennedy Endowed Chair in Waterfowl & Wetlands Conservation

Sustain in perpetuity an internationally recognized, university program in teaching, research, and service focused on (1) gaining science-based knowledge for understanding and conserving waterfowl and other wetland wildlife species, populations, and communities, as well as their habitats; (2) educating current and future waterfowl and wetlands scientists and conservationists; and (3) providing outreach on waterfowl and wetlands ecology and conservation for public and private stake-holders.

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About Mr. Kennedy

Mr. James C. Kennedy generously established the James C. Kennedy Endowed Chair in Waterfowl and Wetlands Conservation in the Department of Wildlife, Fisheries & Aquaculture of the College of Forest Resources at Mississippi State University in September 2008. This chair is the first in the College, and one of the largest endowments at MSU. Kennedy's gift sustains in perpetuity the teaching, research, and outreach program in waterfowl and wetlands ecology and conservation at MSU.

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Latest News

Deepwater Horizon Project Tracker

A Kennedy chair project on evaluating the efficacy of marsh terraces is featured on the Deepwater Horizon Project Tracker. Visit the tracker at dwhprojecttracker.org/project/749

Delta Waterfowl Hunt Program

Delta Waterfowl Hunt Program students

The weather was cold, clear and breezy for the Delta Waterfowl Mississippi State University Hunt Program this past weekend, but everyone had a good time and learned more about the role waterfowl hunting plays in wildlife conservation. Students participated in two clay shooting events, a mentored hunt, a waterfowl presentation, and demonstrations on concealment, calling, and decoy strategies. Thank

MSU alumni reunite at Duck Symposium

2019 Duck Symposium

Mississippi State faculty, students and alumni reunited at the 2019 Duck Symposium in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada.

Farmed Fish Losses to Scaup Quantified

Avian predators cause serious losses on fish farms. The Southern Regional Aquaculture Center has an on-going project that is measuring the predation risk and economic effects of lesser scaup on baitfish farms and of cormorants on catfish farms. The project team is led by Dr. Luke Roy (Auburn University) with team members including Dr. Anita Kelly (Auburn University), Dr. Brian Davis (Mississippi State University), Dr. Brian Dorr (USDA/WS National Wildlife Research Center), an

Student Spotlight

Stephen Clements

Stephen is conducting surveys of scaup foraging on commercial bait-and sport-fish ponds in eastern Arkansas. Stephen also is collecting invertebrates and scaup to better understand foraging ecology of the birds in these commercial aquaculture facilities. Similar to Terrel’s work, Stephen will ultimately model predation risks imposed by scaup and devise means to ameliorate fish losses on aquacult...

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